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Rockville Neighborhood Real Estate Analysis

Situated in Piedmont region and crossed by three creeks (Rock Creek, Cabin John Creek, and Watts Branch), Rockville provided an excellent refuge for semi-nomadic Native Americans as early as 8000 BC. By the first millennium BC, a few of these groups had settled down into year-round agricultural communities that exploited the native flora, including sunflowers and marsh elder. By AD 1200, these early groups (dubbed Montgomery Indians by later archaeologists) were increasingly drawn into conflict with the Senecas and Susquehannocks who had migrated south from Pennsylvania and New York. Within the present-day boundaries of the city, six prehistoric sites have been uncovered and documented, and borne artifacts several thousand years old. By the year 1700, under pressure from European colonists, the majority of these original inhabitants had been driven away.

The indigenous population carved a path on the high ground, known as Sinequa Trail, which is now downtown Rockville. Later, the Maryland Assembly set the standard of 20 feet for main thoroughfares and designated the Rock Creek Main Road or Great Road to be built to this standard. In the mid-18th century, Lawrence Owen opened a small inn on the road. The place, known as Owen’s Ordinary, took on greater prominence when, on April 14, 1755, Major General Edward Braddock stopped at Owen’s Ordinary on a start of a mission from George Town (now Washington, D.C.) to press British claims of the western frontier. The location of the road, near the present Rockville Pike, was strategically located on higher ground making it dry year-round.[6]:6-9

The first land patents in the Rockville area were obtained by Arthur Nelson between 1717 and 1735. Within three decades, the first permanent buildings in what would become the center of Rockville were established on this land. Still a part of Prince George’s County at this time, the growth of Daniel Dulaney’s Frederick Town prompted the separation of the western portion of the county, including Rockville, into Frederick County in 1748.

Being a small, unincorporated town, early Rockville was known by a variety of names, including Owen’s Ordinary, Hungerford’s Tavern, and Daley’s Tavern. The first recorded mention of the settlement which would later become known as Rockville dates to the Braddock Expedition in 1755. On April 14, one of the approximately two thousand men who were accompanying General Braddock through wrote the following: “we marched to larance Owings or Owings Oardianary, a Single House, it being 18 miles and very dirty.” Owen’s Ordinary was a small rest stop on Rock Creek Main Road (later the Rockville Pike), which stretched from George Town to Frederick Town, and was then one of the largest thoroughfares in the colony of Maryland.

Stone marker on the corner of Vinson St. and Maryland Ave. It was originally placed there in 1803 when Rockville’s streets were laid out. “BR” stands for “Beginning of Rockville”.

On September 6, 1776, the Maryland Constitutional Convention agreed to a proposal introduced by Thomas Sprigg Wootton wherein Frederick County, the largest and most populous county in Maryland, would be divided into three smaller units. The southern portion of the county, of which Rockville was a part, was named Montgomery County. The most populous and prosperous urban center in this new county was George Town, but its location at the far southern edge rendered it worthless as a seat of local government. Rockville, a small, but centrally located and well-travelled town, was chosen as the seat of the county’s government. Thereafter, the village was referred to by all as Montgomery Court House.

Beall-Dawson House, on West Montgomery Avenue near Rockville Town Center, was built in 1815. The home was owned by Upton Beall, Clerk of the Montgomery County Court.

In 1784, William Prather Williams, a local landowner, hired a surveyor to lay out much of the town. In his honor, many took to calling the town Williamsburgh. In practice, however, Williamsburgh and Montgomery Court House were used interchangeably. Rockville came to greater prominence when Montgomery county was created and later when George Town was ceded to the create the District of Columbia.[6]

On July 16, 1803, when the area was officially entered into the county land records, however, the name used was “Rockville,” believed to be derived from Rock Creek.[7] Nevertheless, the name Montgomery Court House continued to appear on maps and other documents through the 1820s.

By petition of Rockville’s citizens, the Maryland General Assembly incorporated the village on March 10, 1860. During the American Civil War, General George B. McClellan stayed at the Beall Dawson house in 1862. In addition, General J.E.B. Stuart and an army of 8,000 Confederate cavalrymen marched through and occupied Rockville on June 28, 1863 while on their way to Gettysburg and stayed at the Prettyman house. Jubal Anderson Early had also crossed through Maryland, on his way to and from his attack on Washington. A monument to the Confederate soldier is hidden behind the old courthouse building [8] or.[9] The monument was dedicated on June 3, 1913 at a cost of $3,600.

In 1873, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad arrived, making Rockville easily accessible from Washington, D.C. (See Metropolitan Branch.) In July 1891, the Tennallytown and Rockville Railway inaugurated Rockville’s first trolley service connecting to the Georgetown and Tennallytown Railway terminus at Western Avenue and Wisconsin Avenue.

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad station in Rockville, built 1873.

This provided service from Georgetown to Rockville, connecting Rockville to Washington, D.C. by trolley. Trolley service operated for four decades, until, eclipsed by the growing popularity of the automobile, service was halted in August 1935. The Blue Ridge Transportation Company provided bus service for Rockville and Montgomery County from 1924 through 1955. After 1955, Rockville would not see a concerted effort to develop a public transportation infrastructure until the 1970s, when the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) began work to extend the Washington Metro into Rockville and extended Metrobus service into Montgomery County. The Rockville station of Washington Metro began service on July 25, 1984, and the Twinbrook station began service on December 15, 1984. Metrobus service was supplemented by Montgomery County’s own Ride On bus service starting in 1979. MARC, Maryland’s Rail Commuter service, serves Rockville with its Brunswick line. From Rockville MARC provides service to Union Station in Washington D.C. (southbound) and, Frederick and Martinsburg, West Virginia (northbound), as well as intermediate points. Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, provides service from Rockville to Chicago and Washington D.C.

During the Cold War, it was considered safer to remain in Rockville than to evacuate during a hypothetical nuclear attack on Washington, D.C. Bomb shelters were built, including the largest one at Glenview Mansion and 15 other locations. The I-270 highway was designated as an emergency aircraft landing strip. Two Nike missile launcher sites were located on Muddy Branch and Snouffer School Roads until the mid-1970s.[6]:163

From the 1960s, Rockville’s town center, formerly one of the area’s commercial centers, suffered from a period of decline. Rockville soon became the first city in Maryland to enter into a government funded urban renewal program. This resulted in the demolition of most of the original business district. Included in the plan was the unsuccessful Rockville Mall, which failed to attract either major retailers or customers and was demolished in 1994, various government buildings such as the new Montgomery County Judicial Center, and a reorganization of the road plan near the Courthouse. Unfortunately, the once-promising plan was for the most part a disappointment. Although efforts to restore the town center continue, the majority of the city’s economic activity has since relocated along Rockville Pike (MD Route 355/Wisconsin Avenue). In 2004, Rockville Mayor Larry Giammo announced plans to renovate the Rockville Town Square, including building new stores and housing and relocating the city’s library. In the past year, the new Rockville Town Center has been transformed and includes a number of boutique-like stores, restaurants, condominiums and apartments, as well as stages, fountains and the Rockville Library.[10] The headquarters of the U.S. Public Health Service is on Montrose Road while the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission‘s headquarters is just south of the City’s corporate limits.

The city is closely associated with the neighboring towns of Kensington and the unincorporated census-designated place, North Bethesda. The Music Center at Strathmore, an arts and theater center, opened in February 2005 in the latter of these two areas and is presently the second home of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and the Fitzgerald Theatre in Rockville Civic Center Park has provided diverse entertainment since 1960. In 1998, Regal Cinemas opened in Town Center.[6]:217. The city also has a brass band in the British style. The REM song (Don’t Go Back To) Rockville released in 1984 was written by Mike Mills about not wanting his girlfriend to return to Rockville, Maryland.

Geography

Boundaries of Rockville as of 2004

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.57 square miles (35.15 km2), of which, 13.51 square miles (34.99 km2) is land and 0.06 square miles (0.16 km2) is water.[2]

For more information on Rockville Maryland Visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockville,_Maryland

Walk Score for Rockville



Rockville School Data

Rockville School Districts

Montgomery County Public Schools
PK-12
http://mcps.k12.md.us/

Rockville Schools

Beverly Farms Elementary School
K-5, public
Brookhaven Elementary School
PK-5, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/brookhavenes/
Candlewood Elementary School
K-5, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/candlewoodes/
Carl Sandburg Center
K-5, public
Cashell Elementary School
PK-5, public
Col. Zadok Magruder High School
9-12, public
College Gardens Elementary School
PK-5, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/collegegardenses/
Earle B. Wood Middle School
6-8, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/woodms/
Fallsmead Elementary School
K-5, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/fallsmeades/
Farmland Elementary School
PK-5, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/farmlandes/
Flower Valley Elementary School
K-5, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/flowervalleyes/
Julius West Middle School
6-8, public
Lakewood Elementary School
K-5, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/lakewoodes/
Lucy V. Barnsley Elementary School
K-5, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/barnsleyes/
Luxmanor Elementary School
PK-5, public
Mark Twain School
7-12, public
Maryvale Elementary School
PK-5, public
Meadow Hall Elementary School
K-5, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/meadowhalles/
Mill Creek Towne Elementary School
PK-5, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/mctes/
Parkland Middle School
6-8, public
Redland Middle School
6-8, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/redlandms/
Richard Montgomery High School
9-12, public
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/rmhs/
Ritchie Park Elementary School
K-5, public
Rock Creek Valley Elementary School
PK-5, public
Rockville High School
9-12, public

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About Albert Hallivis

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Albert Hallivis

My Realtor is Awesome! Washington DC Metro Area, All Maryland Counties

myrealtorisawesome@gmail.com

175 Admiral Cochrane Dr #111, Annapolis, MD 21401

240-461-4377240-461-4377 main

240 461 4377240 461 4377 office

202-810-3860202-810-3860 mobile

Taylor Properties. Serving the DC Metro Area.

175 Admiral Cochrane Dr #111, Annapolis, MD 21401 Office Number is 800-913-4326

About Albert Hallivis

Picture of Albert Hallivis

Albert Hallivis

myrealtorisawesome@gmail.com

202-810-3860202-810-3860 mobile

Taylor Properties. Serving the DC Metro Area.

175 Admiral Cochrane Dr #111, Annapolis, MD 21401 Office Number is 800-913-4326